February 21, 2017

News: Norman Lovett's Red Dwarf return; Amazon acquires Pastewka; + more

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February 20, 2017

A trailer for season 2 of Les Témoins (Witnesses)

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Les Témoins (Witnesses)

I've been a bit occupied with a broken phone today - grrr, argh - so WHYBW is going to have to wait for another time. But I've not forgotten you. Today - hat-tip to Thierry Attard - we have a trailer or two for season 2 of Les Témoins (Witnesses). Despite its being one of the very few French shows to make it to network TV in the UK, I missed the first season because it started airing just before my August holidays. So I can't tell you what that was about, although the suggestions from Wikipedia are that it was quite conventional.

Witnesses is set in the small coastal town of Le Tréport in northern France, where the bodies of murder victims are being unearthed and left for discovery. The former chief-of-police, Paul Maisonneuve (Thierry Lhermitte), is implicated in the murders. Detectives Justin (Jan Hammenecker) and Sandra (Marie Dompnier) investigate the case

Sounds very vanilla.

However, season 2 looks a bit different. Marie Dompnier returns but one of my favourite actresses - Audrey Fleurot of Engrenages (Spiral) fame - is this season's guest star and here are the trailers I promised you.

If your French is a bit duff, that's "15 men found dead, frozen on a bus. All loved the same woman." And here's a write-up which I genuinely did translate myself this time:

A country road along the North Sea, the first day in Spring. 15 dead men, frozen, found sitting quietly in a bus.

Catherine Keemer: a mysterious woman, an amnesiac, discovered the next day in her car, 100km away. The 15 victims in the bus: all the men shared her love, for one night or a year. Sandra Winckler, a determined and obsessed cop who won't tolerate an unsolved mystery. Sandra Winckler (Marie Dompnier) and Catherine Keemer (Audrey Fleurot): two woman who are going to need to unite for the better and against the worst.

Now that's a bit more interesting. The show's back on France 2 in March but no word yet if either Netflix or Channel 4/Walter Presents is going to pick it up. You'd hope, wouldn't you?

PS No, I don't know why the names are above the wrong people in the poster (the tag line: "Love is the biggest danger")

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News: BBC One's gunpowder plot; Brian Pern tribute; new Stephen King drama; + more

Posted yesterday at 07:10 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

New UK TV shows

New UK TV show casting

  • Julia Ormond, Philippa Coulthard, Joseph Quinn et al joins BBC One's Howard's End

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February 17, 2017

Review: Imposters 1x1-1x2 (US: Bravo)

Posted 3 days ago at 22:07 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Imposters

In the US: Tuesdays, 10/9c, Bravo

Con artists aren't very nice people. They lie, cheat and steal from people to benefit themselves, those people typically being old, trusting and/or not very rich, and who therefore typically end up penniless, destitute, futureless and/or suicidal.

What. A. Downer. Huh?

It's no surprise, therefore, that shows that have focused on 'flim flam' men and women, such as Leverage or Perfect Scoundrels, have usually taken no time at all to give their anti-heroes epiphanies in which they realise that their ways are indeed wicked. Before the end of the first episode even, they're off fleecing the deserving - aka people who are both rich and dicks.

Shows that don't? Downers.

That's certainly how you think Imposters is going to be during its first episode. It sees Rob Heaps playing a sensitive young Jewish man who works for his family-owned firm. He sacrificed everything for his family, including his dreams of seeing Paris, and ends up thinking his life will never amount to anything. Then along comes Belgian breath of fresh air Inbar Levi, the two fall madly in love, and before you know it, they're married and Heaps dares to dream once more.

But before you know it (again), she's emptied their bank account, maxed out the credit cards, taken out a second mortgage on their home and stolen cash from the firm, leaving a parting video explaining that a folder of incriminating evidence will be used to destroy his parents' marriage if he comes looking for her.

All looks bleak and Heaps even tries to commit suicide. Then comes a knock at the door… and the show changes.

Had I not fallen a little behind with my viewing schedule, I might not have bothered watching episode two of Imposters, that first ep is so fundamentally miserable. But since I hadn't watched episode one by the time episode two aired, I ended up watching both en masse. Surprisingly, this is actually probably the best thing you can do, since episode one is less the foundation to the show than its prologue; it's only in episode two that you find out what it's really doing.

It would have helped if the show had stuck to its original title of My So-Called Wife, because oddly enough, Imposters is a buddy-buddy comedy. At Heaps' door is another of Levi's victims - Parker Young (Suburgatory, Enlisted), a knuckle-headed former quaterback and alpha male car salesman. Together, he and the equally penniless and heart-broken Heaps are going to go on a road trip together to find Levi and get their money back. Along the way, they're going to learn the ways of the con artist, be spectacularly bad at them, develop their own code of honour, help each other to get over their former wife, and get on each other's nerves. A lot.

Meanwhile, Levi has moved onto the next job allocated by mysterious boss 'the Doctor' to her and the rest of her team, who include Katherine LaNasa (DeceptionSatisfaction) and Brian Benben (Dream On). With their help, she has to woo a seemingly dickish, cuckolded darts-playing bank CEO (Battlestar Galactica's Aaron Douglas. Yes, it's filmed in Canada - how did you know?), who turns out to be surprisingly sweet. But she's distracted by the possibility of true love with coffee-shop chance encounter Stephen Bishop (Being Mary Jane). Is it time to get out of 'the life' or will the Doctor punish her and Bishop if she tries?

All this is good frothy fun that manages to find both a little depth and a lot more jokes amidst everyone's misery. Levi, who did little as a button-downed Israeli commando on The Last Ship, here demonstrates a really surprising range and is hugely appealing, even when she tricks and misleads everyone she meets. Young and Heaps' routine is both funny and suitably dorky, and their slow crossing over to the dark side is entertaining to watch as they foul up time and again but slowly get better. Their 'code' also shows how morality can blur when you need it to, as they initially write off children and old people as potential marks, settle on 'assholes' as their preferred targets, then decide that 'asshole>old people' in their moral hierarchy when spying a particularly dickish senior with an attractively bulging wallet.

Later episodes are set to add Uma Thurman to the mix, as well as another former spouse of Levi's - a wife this time (Marianne Rendón) - which is bound to change the dynamic of the show once again. Despite its subject matter, while black, Imposters is certainly still a comedy and well worth a try. But you'll need to commit.

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Third-episode verdict: Powerless (US: NBC)

Posted 3 days ago at 17:54 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

BarrometerPowerless.jpgA Barrometer rating of 3

In the US: Thursdays, 8.30/7.30c, NBC

You always have to give a show that's had a revamp a little time to settle in. A little.

When Powerless was commissioned, it was a slightly different show from the one we have now. Set in the world of DC Comics, it featured a slightly dodgy insurance agency run by a supervillain that was trying to make money off the poor folks trampled by superheroes in their fight to stop the bad guys.

But twixt pilot and series, there was a bit of retooling. By the first aired episode, cynical old Vanessa Hudgens had turned into a dewy-eyed optimist wanting to make a difference in a branch of Wayne Industries run by Batman's incompetent narcissist cousin (Alan Tudyk). Trouble is she has a bunch of people rejected by Better Off Ted working for her, including Danny Pudi and Ron Funches, all of whom can do little more than copy Lexcorp's inventions. Can Hudgens turn the division round, save everyone from getting fired, help the little people and meet lots of her superhero idols, all without a single superpower to her?

Watching the first episode, the answer seemed to be "Who cares?", "Why aren't there any proper superheroes in this?" and "When do the jokes start?"

The second episode actually proved worse, since the first episode raised the occasional titter, whereas the second was practically soporific, beyond a nice joke about training videos being like The Shining.

Still, there's a reason that I do these as third-episode verdicts, not second-episode verdicts. You have to give things time. And while episode three wasn't exactly an exercise in hilarity, it was at least a reverse of the previous episode's trajectory and I was able to watch the whole thing with a slight grin on my face, at least. The show featured a superhero I'd actually heard of, although it was The Olympian, so I wouldn't describe that as a mainstream pick by the writers. There were a few in-jokes for comic book fans, with Gail Simone and Marv Wolfman getting name-checked. There was also a halfway decent attempt to tie the show a bit more into mainstream community by making Funches Atlantean ("Atlantis: home of Aquaman and character actor William H Macey"), allowing copious references to Aquaman. Corbin Bernsen's arrival as Tudyk's dad seemed to make everyone up their game. And the opening dialogue among the characters about racism ("I thought you said you were from Atlanta" "No, that's Donald Glover, but it might be racist that you heard that") almost made me laugh.

Almost. Because we're still not exactly in Silicon Valley or Man Seeking Woman territory here. But the show is at least finding its feet now. I doubt, given that we'll be at episode four next week, that the show will ever drag itself out of its z-list superhero obsession or become even laugh-out-loud funny. Not giving Danny Pudi any decent lines is a Category A disaster. But you can at least watch it and not feel like Superman near Lex Luthor's kryptonite ring any more, which is a definite improvement.

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When's that show you mentioned starting again, TMINE? Including Lethal Weapon, Chicago Justice, Anne and Dear White People

Posted 3 days ago at 17:31 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Every Friday, I let you know the latest announcements about when new, imported TV shows will finally be arriving on UK screens - assuming anyone's bought anything, of course.

A few new shows have been given their starting dates this week, although most of them are Netflix originals or haven't started airing yet, so I haven't seen them. Oh well, at least you'll know when they start.

Lethal Weapon (US: Fox; UK: ITV)
Friday, March 3, 9pm
Reviews: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

Chicago Justice (US: NBC; UK: Universal Channel)
Thursday, March 30, 9pm

Dear White People (Netflix)
Friday, April 28

Anne (Canada: CBC; UK: Netflix)
Friday, May 12

News: The Royals renewed; Kevin Smith's Sam and Twitch; Natalie Dormer picnics at Hanging Rock; + more

Posted 4 days ago at 06:28 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

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  • Natalie Dormer, Lola Bessis, Yael Stone et al to star in Foxtel's Picnic at Hanging Rock

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February 16, 2017

Third-episode verdict: Riverdale (US: The CW; UK: Netflix)

Posted 4 days ago at 18:33 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

BarrometerRiverdale.jpgA Barrometer rating of 2

In the US: Thursdays, 9/8c, The CW
In the UK: Available on Netflix. New episode every Friday

Which would you rather make: the next Twin Peaks or the next Smallville? It's not as easy a choice as you might think. Sure, Twin Peaks is revered enough that it's coming back after 25 years and it gets mentioned in all manner of "Top n shows in TV history" lists whereas Smallville never won and never will win any critics awards for its fine storytelling. But Smallville also lasted a record-breaking 10 seasons to become the longest-running North American science-fiction series, whereas Twin Peaks never even made it to three.

In its first episode, Riverdale seemed to be aiming to be the new Twin Peaks. A reimagining of the long-lasting American comic book Archie set in a genial small town, complete with a classic love triangle in the form of swell guy and gals Archie, Veronica and Betty, Riverdale updated it, put new spins on all the old characters and then threw in a murder-mystery for luck. Replete with ravishing visuals and smart dialogue, it gave younger and older viewers plenty to enjoy, including thrills and excitement, without sacrificing the comic's generally genial atmosphere.

Since then, the show has started to change into something a bit more conventional and 'teenish'. Episode two occupied a halfway house between the old aesthetic and the new aesthetic, with the show trying to be both a dark murder mystery and a full-on comedy and not quite working as it shifted between tones. Nevertheless, the bonding between Betty and Veronica was well executed and the dialogue maintained its smartness, at least. And, of course, we got Jossy and the Pussycats singing their own version of classic The Archies song 'Sugar, Sugar':

Episode three continued the descent in quality by being a modern-day "Very Special Episode" about slut-shaming that decided to take in Wild Things along the way for no well defined reason. Smartness and sassiness generally went down a hole, and the need for the very white Archie's musical ambitions to bear fruit via the all-black, all-female Josie and the Pussycats led to a nails-on-chalkboard attempt to square that particular circle… as well as yet another musical number in the style of Smallville's frequent trips to 'the Talon'.

Riverdale's not entirely lost sight of its original ambitions and episode three has the rather marvellous suggestion that sweet as apple pie Betty might have multiple personality disorder and could even be her own crazy (murderous) twin sister, Polly. But the adults have stopped being adult and have started to become cliched, and the murder-mystery side of things has become more than a little silly. Coupled with the continuing inappropriate and probably illegal relationship between Archie and his music teacher, where it's hard to tell which is the adult and which is the child, and it's all starting to feel far less promising than when it started.

There could still be plenty of mileage in Riverdale - after all, not every episode of Twin Peaks was a classic, let alone Smallville. It's still got a winning cast and a reasonably strong foundation. It just needs to decide what it wants to do in life.

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News: Raid remake; Goliath, Superstore renewed; Love Actually mini-sequel; + more

Posted 5 days ago at 06:27 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Film casting

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  • Benedict Cumberbatch to star in BBC One's adaptation of Ian McEwan's The Child In Time
  • Hayley Atwell, Matthew Macfayden and Tracey Ullman to star in BBC/Starz adaptation of EM Foster's Remains of the Day

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February 14, 2017

Weekly Wonder Woman: Wonder Woman #16, Batman '66 Meets Wonder Woman '77 #6, Justice League/Power Rangers #2

Posted 7 days ago at 14:00 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

If toys are your thing, this week's been great for Wonder Woman fans. You might, for example, already be booking tickets to see 'The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes' on the South Bank in London, where you'll be able to see a Lego Wonder Woman - and not the tiny mini-figure version, either.

If Lego's not your thing, though, some of the toys being released by Mattel to accompany Wonder Woman have been revealed, too:

Wonder Woman toy

It'll make a change from playing with your Malibu Barbie, at least.

After the jump, though, we'll look at the latest DC Comics to feature our Diana: Wonder Woman #16 continues the story of Diana's arrival in Man's World, gives us a couple of new gods to admire and has our heroine dealing with a chimera; meanwhile, Batman '66 Meets 'Wonder Woman '77 #6 sees our time-warped heroes dealing with a Griffin; and Justice League/Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #2 pits the Justice League against a team of ninja with giant robot dinosaurs - they're the good guys, too, though. Surprise!

Continue reading "Weekly Wonder Woman: Wonder Woman #16, Batman '66 Meets Wonder Woman '77 #6, Justice League/Power Rangers #2"

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Review: Newton's Law 1x1 (Australia: ABC)

Posted 7 days ago at 11:25 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Newtons Law

In Australia: Thursdays, 8.33pm, ABC

There's something about an overly clever title that suggests the show itself isn't going to be very good. A stupid title is obviously a big warning klaxon but while a clever title can be a fair indicator of quality, an overly clever title suggests more thought has gone into the title than the show itself.

Newton's Law. Ha, ha. Look at that. It's a TV series about a lawyer and her name is Josephine Newton, so Newton's Law. Gettit?

So klaxons went off as soon as I saw the title - justified klaxons, since Newton's Law is pretty weak stuff (well, G is 6.674×10-11N, ha, ha), despite having been created by Deb Cox and Fiona Eagger, the originators of the much-loved Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries.

It stars the almost equally loved Claudia Karvan (The Secret Life of Us, Spirited, Puberty Blues, Love My Way) as the eponymous Newton, a former high-flying barrister turned suburban solicitor now undergoing a separation as her globe-trotting eco-warrior husband (Brett Tucker) is never home. Despite having helped the down-trodden for over a decade, her offices are firebombed by a hacked-off client, leaving Karvan in a potentially parlous state. But former sparring partner and admirer Toby Schmitz comes to the rescue, asking her to join his plush legal firm, co-run by Andrew McFarlane (Glitch), where she can once again resume the bar and recapture her glory days. However, her do-gooding spirits aren't so easily tamed and by the end of the first episode, she's back helping her former clients, albeit from her old firm's new offices in an abandoned car wash.

The show's stated ambition is to be a sort of Upstairs Downstairs for the Australian legal system, counterpointing the daily work of barristers working for rich clients against that of solicitors working for impoverished Joe Public. However, there's little of that in this first episode, which is more concerned with setting up the upstairs and the downstairs companies, Karvan's relationship with husband and teenage daughter, her "will they, won't they?" relationship with Schmitz, and her trainwreck friendship with her trainwreck business partner (Georgina Naidu).

All of which should be lovely and fluffy, but the show clunks along like a Ford Cortina with a broken gearbox. Karvan is long-suffering, a great friend, a put-upon wife, much sought after, knows all the right crowd and defends the little people while sticking it to the man, whenever possible - yeah! Right on! Indeed, both producers and characters are in thrall to Newton's supposed brilliance. 

But actually, Newton's Law never really demonstrates why anyone would consider her so amazing, beyond the fact she had a cool car. Surely someone with a cool old American muscle car must be a top legal mind as well, though, right?

The legal side is, at least, a bit more promising than all this girl power by numbers, starting us off with a plot lift straight out of 12 Angry Men, with a young man accused of murder and a nearby witness willing to swear she saw everything. But did she what she thought she saw?

While the trappings of the Australian legal system are at least more familiar to UK viewers than the average US legal drama's, making Newton's Law potentially more appealing, none of it is any more realistic than the average US legal drama and it's all very sub-Crownies. Indeed, as with Janet King, Karvan ultimately saves the day not through her marvellous knowledge of the law or rhetoric but investigating the crime herself by ferreting around behind bookcases and discovering incriminating envelopes. Maybe that's how Karvan can even contemplate doing both jobs, given the ridiculous hours both barristers and solicitors have to put in, since it's clearly not going to be by looking through the statute books. 

Newton's Law is the kind of thing that should play well on daytime TV, probably after the latest Father Brown has aired. But it lacks any edge, USP or fire that would make it work as a primetime drama - or worth seeking out, rather than merely watching while you do the ironing.

Full details of the BFI & Radio Times Television Festival

Posted 7 days ago at 10:08 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

The Crown at the BFI and Radio Times Television Festival

Although March might be a bit of a wash-out for tele at the BFI, April is looking a whole lot more promising thanks to the BFI & Radio Times Television Festival. I've already given you the highlights, but the BFI has now provided the rundown for the whole thing, including some shiny new events, special guests and even some archive French TV featuring Tom Baker. Being lazy, I've copied and pasted the whole shebang below.

New special guests* announced today include: Dame Maggie Smith (DOWNTON ABBEY), Aidan Turner (POLDARK), Claire Foy (THE CROWN), Stephen Daldry (THE CROWN), Sir Ridley Scott (TABOO), Charlie Brooker (BLACK MIRROR), Rowan Atkinson (MAIGRET), Jenna Coleman (VICTORIA), Susanne Bier (THE NIGHT MANAGER), Joe Wicks (THE BODY COACH), Jasmine and Melissa Hemsley (HEMSLEY + HEMSLEY), Tom Kerridge (TOM KERRIDGE'S PROPER PUB FOOD), Jack Thorne (NATIONAL TREASURE), Jed Mercurio (LINE OF DUTY), Lee Mack (NOT GOING OUT), Barry Cryer (I’M SORRY I HAVEN’T A CLUE), Adam Hills (THE LAST LEG/PARALYMPICS), Simon Nye (THE DURRELLS)

Guests join those names already announced: Michael Palin (MONTY PYTHON), Steven Moffat (DOCTOR WHO, SHERLOCK), Mark Gatiss (SHERLOCK), Julie Walters (NATIONAL TREASURE/DINNER LADIES), Keeley Hawes (THE DURRELLS), Josh O'Connor (THE DURRELLS), Simon Nye (THE DURRELLS), Freida Pinto (GUERRILLA), Babou Ceesay (GUERRILLA), Walter Iuzzolino (WALTER PRESENTS), Jacqueline Wilson (TRACY BEAKER), Judith Kerr (THE TIGER WHO CAME TO TEA), Michael Morpurgo (WAR HORSE) and Helen and Rob from The Archers

The BFI and Radio Times today announce the full line-up for the BFI & Radio Times Television Festival, celebrating the current golden age of TV with more than 40 events featuring some of the biggest names on the small screen. The new events announced today include the stars, writers and producers of some of the biggest TV shows of the year; including The Crown, Victoria, The Night Manager, Line of Duty, Poldark, Sherlock, Black Mirror and Strictly Come Dancing. Joining the line-up of TV stars is acclaimed director Sir Ridley Scott, who will be in conversation following a screening on Saturday 8 April of The Author of Beltraffio (TF1 1974), a precious gem which has recently been rediscovered by the BFI National Archive, and was directed by Sir Ridley’s brother, the late Tony Scott. This TV drama has been unseen since its UK transmission in 1976 and stars Doctor Who’s fourth Time Lord Tom Baker.

Other highlights announced today include:

IN CONVERSATION:

  • Dame Maggie Smith will make a rare appearance onstage on Saturday 8 April; the legendary Downton Abbey actor will reflect on her life on stage and screen.
  • The satirical writer and broadcaster Charlie Brooker will talk about his work including Screenwipe, Dead Set and the award-winning Black Mirror as well as his TV influences on Sunday 9 April.
  • Comedians Lee Mack and Barry Cryer have spent many years writing sketches and sitcoms for television; join these two giants of comedy on Sunday 9 April as they discuss their craft and comedies past, present and future.

PANEL DISCUSSIONS:

  • Opening the Festival on Friday 7 April will be an event dedicated to Maigret starring Rowan Atkinson. Atkinson will be joined by exec producer John Simenon, son of original Maigret creator Georges Simenon, to talk about bringing the enigmatic sleuth to the small screen.
  • A panel discussion about Netflix’s lavish drama The Crown with executive producer Stephen Daldry, Claire Foy, who plays the Queen, and more cast and crew TBA will take place on Saturday 8 April. The discussion will offer audiences an insight into the making of this majestic drama which recently won Golden Globes for actor Claire Foy and for Best Drama.
  • On Saturday 8 April Victoria stars Jenna Coleman and Tom Hughes will take a break from filming the second series, along with writer-creator Daisy Goodwin and executive producer Damien Timmer, to discuss ITV’s Sunday night hit drama.
  • The compelling adaptation of John le Carré’s book The Night Manager became one of the TV highlights of 2016; on Sunday 9 April Oscar-winning director Susanne Bier, executive producers Simon Cornwell and Stephen Garrett, and cast member Alistair Petrie will explain how they created such brilliant water-cooler TV that kept us on the edge of our seats.
  • On Saturday 8 April there will be a special Poldark event, with the drama’s leading man Aidan Turner, writer Debbie Horsfield and executive producer Damien Timmer. Audiences will also get a glimpse of series three, due to be aired this autumn.
  • On Sunday 9 April join Doctor Who executive producer Brian Minchin, and cast members to talk about the joys and challenges of making the world’s longest-running sci-fi series. With a sneak preview of clips from the upcoming series, set to be the last full series for Moffat and for star Peter Capaldi.
  • Moffat’s other worldwide smash for the BBC is the marvellous re-imagining of Arthur Conan Doyle’s great detective Sherlock, co-written and co-created by Mark Gatiss and exec-produced by Moffat’s wife Sue Vertue. An event on Sunday 9 April will see a discussion of the compelling sound of Sherlock with Gatiss and Vertue along with composers David Arnold and Michael Price.
  • Join writer Jed Mercurio and members of the cast of Line of Duty on Saturday 8 April as they discuss the latest series of the compelling drama as it moves to BBC One and the dark word of AC12 and police corruption. 
  • Meet the unsung stars of Strictly Come Dancing on Saturday 8 April; executive producer Louise Rainbow, talent executive Vinnie Shergill, director of choreography Jason Gilkison and head of costume Vicky Gill are some of the team responsible for putting together the glitziest programme on TV.
  • On Sunday 9 April athletes Libby Clegg and Susie Rogers will be joined by comedian and Last Leg host Adam Hills to discuss how Channel 4’s exciting, dedicated coverage of The Paralympics has changed public attitudes towards those who are physically different.
  • Join the country’s best-loved wordsmith Susie Dent on Saturday 8 April as she vacates Countdown’s dictionary corner to take audiences on an entertaining and informative journey across the rolling landscape of the English language.

MASTERCLASSES:

  • How to Become a Social Media Star on Saturday 8 April with guests Joe Wicks (The Body Coach) and the Hemsley Sisters (Hemsley + Hemsley), will reveal how they turned themselves into lifestyle gurus, TV presenters, and social media stars.
  • BAFTA-winning writer Jack Thorne will give a masterclass on Sunday 9 April, speaking about his influences and work at the forefront of British TV’s current golden age including National Treasure, Skins, Shameless and The Fades and his forthcoming adaption of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials for the BBC.

TREASURES FROM THE BFI NATIONAL ARCHIVE:

  • Sir Ridley Scott will be in discussion following a screening of his brother Tony’s TV drama Author of Beltraffio (TF1, 1974) which has remained unseen since its UK transmission in 1976. This drama was the British contribution to a five-part series of Henry James stories made for French TV in 1974 and stars Tom Baker.
  • The Festival programmers have plundered the BFI National Archive to put together a collection of memorable moments from Tom Jones’ outstanding ATV series This Is Tom Jones (1969-1971); on Saturday 8 April audiences will be able to revel in clips of special stars such as Dusty Springfield and Stevie Wonder performing one-off duets with their host.
  • TV Dinners with Tom Kerridge on Saturday 8 April will celebrate larger-than-life cookery stars such as Fanny Cradock and even Vincent Price, bringing us up to date via Mary Berry and Delia Smith with clips drawn from the BFI National Archive and hosted by the Michelin-starred chef and TV cookery star Tom Kerridge.

FAMILY EVENTS:

  • On Sunday 9 April there will be a preview of two brand new episodes from CBBC’s top football drama Jamie Johnson. Hear from the writers, selected cast and crew, plus a special celebrity guest, after the screening.

EVENTS WITH RADIO TIMES EXPERTS:

  • Spoiler alert! How to Write About Television on Saturday 8 April will see Radio Times’ TV Editor Alison Graham, Deputy TV Editor David Butcher and RT’s Choices writers share a few secrets of the previewer’s art.
  • The Making of a Cover Star on Saturday 8 April sees Radio Times Art Director Shem Law and prolific Radio Times photographer Don Smith discuss 90 years of iconic covers and what it takes to create them.

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What TV's on at the BFI in March 2017? Including Reporting History: Kate Adie in Conversation

Posted 7 days ago at 09:57 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

March looks like it's going to be a quiet month at the BFI for TV lovers. In fact, there's precisely one event happening and that's a chat with Kate Adie about her career. Still, Kate Adie's cool so that's pretty good.

Monday 6 March
18:15 NFT1
Reporting History: Kate Adie in Conversation 
TRT 90min

Kate Adie is one of the UK’s most trusted and respected journalists. Her incisive and informative reporting from the front line has bought contemporary history into the living rooms of millions of viewers and provided us all with a global perspective on major events. As the BBC’s Chief News Correspondent her assignments have included: the final NATO intervention in Kosovo; the Herald of Free Enterprise disaster; the massacre at Dunblane; the SAS lifting of the Iran Embassy Siege in London; and the Tiananmen Square protest in Beijing in 1989. Join Adie as she discusses her amazing career alongside fascinating clips, followed by a chance for you to ask your own questions. 
Tickets £16, concs £12 (Members pay £1.70 less)

Champions' priority booking: February 6 11.30am
Members' priority booking opens: February 7 11.30am
Public booking opens: February 14 11.30am

Prices
Members: £10.10
Member concs: £7.55
Non-members: £11.75
Non-member concs: £9.20
Under 16s £6.00

Reduced prices for weekday matinees. Conc prices are available to senior citizens, students, unwaged and disability visitors. Proof of eligibility may be required.
As always, visit the BFI web site for more details.

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